Does Content Marketing Take Too Much Time?

Does Content Marketing Take Too Much Time?

The Internet is drowning in a sea of content – and the main culprit has to be so-called ‘content marketing’… The first-fruits of this come-lately type of marketing are supposed to be enhanced SEO/SERPs results; establishing yourself as an ‘expert’ in your field; and providing visitors to your website with the type of useful information that will encourage them to re-visit the site and/or share the content on social media. No-one could argue that these are laudable aims with tangible benefits. Everyone gains and this kind of activity earns valuable SEO brownie points from the search engines, whilst also validating their raison d’etre. One of the major problems with content marketing, however, is that an ‘average’ company will run out of the content that meets Google’s criteria for original, useful material in a relatively short space of time. Creating quality content – regularly! To produce content on a regular basis, so many companies are forced into dredging up sub-standard material from within their own industry or re-cycling material that’s already in the public domain. The net effect of this is the deluge of ‘me-too’ stuff that no-one really wants to read. It helps of course if you have a copywriter or marketing agency to come up with new and useful content, but you may well be left wondering about how many ways there are to skin a cat. For companies who may not want to invest in professional content creators, and for those who are sceptical about the ROI for these activities, there is always the DIY route. As everyone knows, ‘content’ is all around us – potentially… and... Read more...

Integrated Marketing and The Endless Echoes of Mad Men

In case you hadn’t noticed, ‘integrated marketing’ has come full circle. Back in the day, when Mad Men roamed Madison Avenue and TV advertising was the new kid on the block, everyone wanted a slice of the marketing action. In late-1950s Britain, television sets in everyone’s living room marked the end of post-war austerity and, with it, the beginnings of an affluent consumerist society that continued throughout the 1960s and on into the present day. TV advertising was a powerful tool of mass communication that eclipsed print media, direct marketing and PR almost overnight, particularly among those with bigger budgets. It’s often said that history repeats itself. That would certainly seem to be the case with integrated marketing. To get a handle on the historical perspective of it all, you need to compare the Mad Men era and the arrival of TV advertising with the emergence in our own era of Internet marketing and Google. Both of these phenomena transformed marketing as it was known hitherto – and both ended with an aftermath of integrated marketing that sought to make sense of a new and dominant marketing force. The underlying driver on both occasions was the realisation that we shouldn’t risk throwing the baby out with the bath water.   In The 1960s… TV advertising in the 50s and 60s was a potent and entertaining medium with the power to engage and persuade like nothing that had gone before. Or was it? Apart from being incredibly expensive, TV advertising in 1960s Britain had a limited platform of only one commercial TV station. Even if your company could afford it,... Read more...
Marketing Services – Who's to Blame?  You or Your Supplier?

Marketing Services – Who's to Blame? You or Your Supplier?

So you’re running a business and you’ve contracted out the various marketing services your business needs.  The problem is: you’re not happy with what you’re getting.  Maybe you feel it’s poor value for money, or the quality of work that’s being produced isn’t generating the returns you would realistically like to see on your investment. What can you do about it?  The likelihood is that you’ve felt uneasy for quite a while, largely because a period of time has to elapse before you can see how effective an agency’s work really is. To complicate things, it may be that your outside supplier was recommended by a trusted friend or business colleague.  Or maybe there are one or two people in your company who are perfectly happy with your current arrangement? (The assumption here is that you’re the one who’s in a position to do something about the problem, either by removing the offending supplier or by persuading colleagues that you all have a liability in your midst!) It’s usually the case in this type of predicament that your gut feeling is right and you should therefore take whatever action is necessary – sooner rather than later. Nevertheless, it may be a good idea to draw up a list of what your main issues are with the arrangement – whether or not other people will be involved subsequently in working with you to find a solution. What Are Your Concerns? As with all business problems, you first need to identify what’s going wrong – and then find ways of putting it right.  This may sound obvious, but have you considered... Read more...