Travel Copywriting for All-inclusive Holidays

  Does anyone really care whether all-inclusive holidays come with a bag-full of issues?  Or is it simply the case that you either love ’em or hate ’em?  For copywriters who are involved with the marketing of ‘all-inclusives’, these are real challenges that mean you’re starting off on the wrong foot.  In short, the issues focus on the perception that these ‘sunshine centres’ are in some way down-market (even though most are in fantastic locations with amazing facilities). There is also the claim that all-inclusive holidays drain the local economy of much-needed tourist revenue (because everything ‘touristic’ goes on behind the tour operator’s closed doors). Again, this is debatable because hotels of every type – in every location – tend to be self-contained, with a range of services that will maximise their income.   Overcoming Misconceptions Given that certain people view all-inclusives with a jaundiced eye, how can copywriters overcome these points of prejudice? As with all copywriting projects, it’s important to ‘get under the skin’ of your prospects.  It is of course difficult when someone doesn’t like the idea of being part of a large group where they feel their individuality has been compromised in some way. It’s even more difficult when someone takes the snobbish view that they’re likely to be rubbing shoulders with the ‘wrong sort’ (similar to the way British holiday camps such as Butlin’s and Pontin’s were viewed in the post-war period). It’s clear that all-inclusives have their own set of marketing challenges to overcome.  A travel copywriter’s superlatives and honeyed USPs will fall some way short of the mark. In common with all... Read more...

Travel Copywriters Work In The Real World

I’ve been looking at what other travel copywriters have been up to. What struck me most forcibly was the difference in the type of work we do. It’s worth pointing out that there’s a major divide between ‘travel writers’ who go intrepidly into the world, Marco Polo style in search of the true essence of travel, and ‘travel copywriters’ like myself who focus on the packages and services that clients provide. For travel writers, there’s a sense that they’re following a dream – ‘a calling’ if you will – that looks just a tad narcissistic to an armchair copywriter like myself. The claim that “As a travel writer, I’m not in it for the money” rings a little hollow. If it’s not for the money, then it’s obviously to satisfy a personal longing of some sort, or to prove a point to the world. If that sounds like sour grapes, it certainly is not. ‘On location’ certainly has its plus points, but most travel industry clients would have their own people on-the-spot in whatever locations in the world they’re offering their holidays. As with other copywriting clients in non-travel sectors, it makes sense for the experienced experts to brief me – an experienced travel copywriter – about their business. True travel writers often have their own agendas. Some include photography as part of their service – and why not! If you’re peering into a volcano, over a majestic waterfall or stuck up K2 in Nepal, you may as well back up your words with some breath-taking photos! Most travel writers, I would guess, yearn to write books about their... Read more...